The Flowering Vine: She Needed Me…

cemetery-1169711_1920

She wanted him

BUT he wanted me

So she

Stormed

And she seethed

 

She wanted him

BUT he wanted me

So she

Sought

And she stalked

 

She wanted him

BUT he wanted me

So she

Schemed

And she steamed

 

She wanted him

So she needed me

to be

Silenced

Sequestered

Severed

And sliced

Eternally

encased

And placed…

out of sight.

 

For Aunt Elvy’s daughter, Alberta, (Mother’s dear first cousin and friend), reportedly murdered by a jealous rival.

 

 

 

 

 

125 thoughts on “The Flowering Vine: She Needed Me…

  1. This is a little bit of a prologue on this gem, from Mom over on FB:

    Just a tidbit to add to SHE NEEDED ME. Alberta was not only Mother’s First Cousin, but they were also BFF’s. When MOTHER died at one hundred years and six months, she still had with her possessions, a child’s rocker that once belonged to Alberta. That’s Love!

    Liked by 2 people

      1. Hey Lady G/Ron: could you indulge me please? When you both have time, could we have a joint post on ‘The Rocker’? I think that deserves a whole post on it’s own! Say, you could write something from the point of view of The Rocker – how it felt, what it saw, how it impacted on Mother, how Alberta felt … that sort of thing. Respectfully, I hope I am not being presumptuous here. Apologies if I am! 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

  2. I think I’ve read this 10 times now….
    It’s amazing how you can put us as readers in the situation, in the moment, in the experience with your words.
    Powerful and tragic. We grieve with you, my friend Beautifully written.
    Love and hugs

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Firstly my sympathies to your family for this tragedy. You are a very brave lady Gwin to bear this weight and still keep smiling and bringing us brightness in your blog.
    Secondly the poem is incredible for the recurring rhythm and repeating of words which bring home the horror of what is to come.
    Alberta is now alive and known in the WP world and so becomes immortal.
    All the best
    Roger

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Thank you, Roger 🙂
      I really appreciate that.
      Yes, it makes me feel good to know that Alberta and the rest of the leaves on The Flowering Vine have come alive—all over the world!
      Thanks to you and so many others 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Well, well – a poetess in the making. I’m sorry the poem is based on such a tragic event but then many poems are based on emotions, unresolved issues or serve as lessons for us to take away. You’ve done a sterling job in using such a dramatic form of writing and use of alliteration and metaphor. Well done Lady G. Now may I see more of that poetry you been hiding from us? 😊

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Chevvy dearest! We don’t want to see more murder poems!!! I (respectfully) put lol beside this, as it really is no laughing matter. Joking aside, I know what you mean though. 🙂 Lady G has done exceptionally well writing a brilliant poem, although sadly based on tragic events of the past. Life is not all ha ha hee hee to quote a brilliant actress and comedian Myra Syal, so we need these poems which portray the dark side of life, sadly.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Hello Marie, I guess the emotions dictate what we write. But I’m always encouraging people to see that they have a poet within so I’m just so excited to see this poem and it’s style matches the brutality of the subject. Crimes of passion are dramatic and singleminded. Of course the challenge is out there Lady G, to try your hand on other themes.😀

        Liked by 3 people

        1. Hi Chevvy, you are absolutely right my dear! I probably would have shied away from attempting the subject of murder, but these things do form part of life’s tapestry and should be addressed. It is challenging though and I think Lady G did this really well.
          Encouragement is always good! 🙂

          Liked by 3 people

        2. Hey my sweet!
          Thank you for your wonderful encouragement.
          I remember playing with poetry when I was younger but then I grew up and discovered the complexity of the art…That’s why I admire you, Marie and Ron.
          What’s funny is that this story wanted to be told in this format–maybe to keep me from otherwise belaboring a very tragic event.
          🌹

          Liked by 2 people

        3. Anytime sweetheart. You know I taught poetry and Shakespeare and the rest of them folks but it is not the same as being a poet yourself.
          I think poetry can be a very spiritual thing where, as you say, the story needed to be told for some reason and in that form (sharp as a knife). I haven’t forgotten that bit of a Seer in you so who knows- you had to say it and someone had to hear it.
          Glad to catch you at this time. I couldn’t get back to sleep so I thought I’d catch up a little before I go back to sleep. My days of hanging out here as I like are numbered😉

          Liked by 3 people

        4. Thank you Chevvy for that.
          And yes, ‘the seer’ in me recognizes that this poem had a two-fold purpose. Maybe it will cause someone out there to re-evaluate some things…..
          And…I hear you my friend…I hear you 🌹

          Liked by 3 people

        5. Chevvy! I didn’t realise that you had actually taught poetry – wow! I feel humbled now, knowing that. So when you have read mine, it has been through the eyes of someone who really know what they are talking about! 🙂

          Liked by 3 people

        6. Good morning Marie and thank you. I taught many years ago so I’m certainly rusty. Poetry has evolved so much over the years and I think it should be judged more by the age in which it exists. Besides, being a critic and poet offers different perspectives.😀

          Liked by 3 people

        7. Good morning Chevvy and I hope you have a wonderful Sunday in sunny, hot South Africa. It is so cold here – I wish I were there! 🙂
          I am finding out new things about you as time progresses and I am wonderfully impressed! When a critic (however rusty! smile!) tells you your poetry is good – that is pretty amazing. One day I must share with you what a literary agent said about my poetry – put it this way: she wasn’t impressed. 🙂

          Liked by 3 people

        8. I don’t think I’d swop weather with you although our temperatures are getting higher each year.

          Thank you for the compliment. I’m blessed to have met so many amazing people and done some interesting things so I hope some of it has rubbed off! I’m not sure that literary agents will be so important with the free flow of information and creativity we have on the internet.

          Liked by 3 people

        9. I think poetry can sometimes be a matter of taste. What appeals to one person doesn’t necessarily resonate with another. I don’t think I’ve ever really read bad poetry (well, maybe one), but just because I don’t understand what the poet is saying (if it’s too obscure) it doesn’t mean it’s bad, only that I don’t understand.

          Liked by 3 people

        10. I don’t know how I missed this M’Lady! I don’t like to feel that I have missed out on a compliment, and I so nearly did! LOL Thanks for mentioning me and it goes without saying that the admiration is mutual.
          If you don’t mind me saying though, that there is no real complexity in writing poetry. Granted some do it better than others (e,g ‘moi’) JOKE! No seriously, some are elevated to genius – there are the greats: Langston Hughes, Shakespeare, Una Marson, Claude McKay (to name a few), but then us lesser mortals do great poetry too, which is not recognised as much, but that doesn’t mean that we can’t all write it. So basically, I am saying don’t think that poetry is more complex than you think Lady G.:)

          Liked by 2 people

        11. Ah…thanks for that advice M’Lady! And for the compliments 🙂 And no worries for the late response. I know that you come around when you can.
          I’ll be over at your place to check in again soon 🙂
          YAAASSSSS!

          Liked by 2 people

  5. This was a hard one to “like” – even though it was powerful and beautifully written. I believe we all have pieces of our histories that make us shiver – but only some of us have murder. Black history has far more than its share, but few for this reason. Chilling, and WELL done!
    xx,
    mgh
    (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMore dot com)
    ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
    “It takes a village to transform a world!”

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much Madelyn 🙂
      I understand exactly what you mean about ‘liking’ it.
      It is important to note that in the South, back in those days, it was not unusual for these sorts of crimes (black on black) to be dismissed (not pursued) by law enforcement.
      So sad 😦

      Liked by 5 people

  6. If my counting is right, that is 27 lines written in a post on the 27th of the month.
    27 powerful, chilling, stirring lines, about a tragic event.

    What can I say? It rocks, Twin. Though the inspiration is very tragic; those words speak. Literally jumping off the screen.

    Well done.

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Thank you Darryl 🙂
      Yeah, it was quite tragic for my Grandmother because they were close. This all happened before I was born.
      But you know what brah? I see your point about love bringing out the worst in people but I gotta question if this woman was capable of love–I don’t even know.
      Crazy huh?
      Always good to see you 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

    2. Darryl, such a paradox! You would think if someone loved so much, the last thing on their mind would be murder. Love is certainly more complex than it appears to be. Or was it love at all? Was it a case of mental illness gone too far??

      Liked by 3 people

  7. Jet

    Gwin, this was a most disconsolate and tragic event, but so beautifully retold. The retelling blasted my memory like a bomb. I remember my Mom telling me of this incident but it was so sad that after she told me I completely blocked it from my memory, until now! Sensational!

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Thank you so much Aunt Jet. Mother shared this story with me and I felt the same way you did.
      Daddy actually reminded me about it a couple of weeks ago.
      For a long time, I think I did exactly what you did and blocked it from memory.
      Thank you for commenting. I really appreciate it🙏🏾🌷

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Beautifully put Cuz! This is my first introduction to the perils of Alberta and I must say, it was an awesome introduction indeed.

    What is so awesome is that, even though we’re 1st cousins; sharing so much common ancestry, I’m learning things from reading your posts that I didn’t know.

    This is what I had hoped TFV would be like; fruit of the vine budding, flowering and ripening here, for all who wish, to share and partake of.

    Thanks for taking the fruit of this vine and squeezing it through the “wordpress” of your imagination and talent, so that we might all take an intoxicating sip…or two!

    Love you my Cousin.

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Aww cuz! You got me blushing! Thank you so much. Yeeaaaah, this was one of the tragedies that touched the vine.
      I’m glad that TFV is turning out as you envisioned🙏🏾💋
      I love you more handsome!

      Liked by 4 people

  9. OMG!!!! I know you hinted at the tragedies in your life, but I never dreamed murder. The poem is of course heartrending. RIP Alberta.
    My love to you Lady G – this can’t have been an easy post to write. Well done for being so brave to share it with us here. I can’t say anymore because this is so sad. Love, Marie

    Liked by 3 people

Comments are closed.