A Quick Summer Solstice Reading 2019

Courtesy of Alluring Intuitive

The Alluring Intuitive

Solstice Reading 2019

Welcome,

I am Lady G, aka The Alluring Intuitive, and I am glad that you dropped by my spot for a message 🙂

Just so you know, my readings are not meant to be predictive but they do typically offer confirmation.

That said, they may or may not resonate with you.

I am often told by followers that my reading applied when they saw it (or later)…not on the date it was posted!

It is also important to note that I am an intuitive reader so these same cards could easily be interpreted quite differently by a traditional tarot card reader.

And so…

Let us commence with today’s Summer Solstice message for 2019:

As you know, my loves, we are always planting seeds.  Some we know about on a conscious level and some we plant on a subconscious level.

Today’s reading is about the seeds that some of us have…

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Last Night of Summer

 

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Far be it from me to skip out and NOT post something to acknowledge my favorite season…

Autumn!

Fall!

Those of you who followed this blog when it was an active thingy will remember that Autumn is my JAM!

And so…

I had to take time today to greet the Autumnal Equinox and all of my friends on WordPress!

I miss you all so much!

Here are a few pictures of how I spent the last evening of Summer (2018) with our dear Luna and friends!

As you know, Mother moon was doing her waxing gibbous thing.

No doubt, preparing for the upcoming equinox, and for all of her glory when she will show her full self as the harvest moon.

Uh huh….

And so….

At summer’s end, LadyG–lover of music, magick, and dance…

sashayed…

twirled…

spun…

twisted…

and flourished herself into a foolish frenzy!

Right there underneath the moonlight!

Poolside no less!

Baby, ALL OF THE elements were at play!

Perhaps the universe noticed my whimsy!

And…

Maybe it will bring more things to dance about…

for ME…

AND…

for YOU!

I love you all!  Stop by and say hello in comments

Love and light!

LadyG 😘💋💋

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Is that a blue orb?  Spooky!

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Panther takes a dip!

Me-Sept 2018

The Flowering Vine: Only The Strong Survive

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ONLY THE STRONG SURVIVE

Oh, you’ve got to be a man, you’ve got to take a stand

Only the strong survive, only the strong survive

Well, you’ve got to be strong, you’d better hold on

Only the strong survive

Only the strong survive, only the strong survive

Well, you’ve got to be a man (yeah), you’ve got to take a stand (yeah)

Only the strong survive, only the strong survive

Only the strong survive, only the strong survive

Only the strong survive, only the strong survive

(JERRY BUTLER, the ICEMAN)

Summers were the worse!

Those hot, sweltering, sweating days, increased the demand for ice ten-fold! When the demand for ice increased ten-fold, Granddaddy Leroy’s workload increased ten-fold

In the 1940’s and 50’s, Granddaddy managed the “ice plant” in Eufaula, Alabama. In those days, folks stored their ice in “iceboxes”; not refrigerators–those new-fangled contraptions were only available to the rich, but the average middle-class family could probably afford the less expensive “icebox”.

As for the poor, well they generally dug a hole out in the yard; then lined the hole with sawdust; then placed the block of ice in the hole; then insulated it with more sawdust; then covered the hole until they were ready for some ice. Then, when they were ready for ice, they’d simply go out to the “ice hole”, armed with an ice pick, hatchet, or an ax, and “chip a piece off the old block”.

When that sizzling, searing, summer heat hit, people craved the cool, cold, comfort of ice. They wanted whatever storage mechanism they had on hand, to be chocked full of ICE! Hence, the “ICEMAN”.

Curiously, no “White” men worked in the ice plant. Granddaddy was the closest thing to a White man there, so I guess that qualified him to be the manager. But being “manager” did not mean his workload was any less than anyone else’s; as a matter of fact, he may have been the “hardest working man” in the ice plant. Granddaddy worked, and worked, his fingers to the bone—all 8 of them—trying to keep those ice-making machines humming.

That truck? Wow man, that truck was something to behold! I think I might have a picture of one here somewhere. Kids would see that truck coming and stop whatever they were doing to chase that truck. No, it didn’t have a cute jingle ringing out; playing a “Pied Piper-ish” tune to entice them to follow. Ha! No colorful markings to E.N.T.I.C.E, but it had chips of I.C.E.I.N.I.T. There was no ICE CREAM MAN, but there was an ICEMAN, and that was good enough on those hot, hot, summer days.

The “Truck” went around every morning. Part of Granddaddy’s job, as manager, was to hire and pay men to drive the truck around the city to sell 5, 10 and 25 cent blocks of ice. The men would carry the ice into the homes with a set of ice tongs which would hook onto each side of the ice, making it easier for the “Icemen” to handle. Leroy Jr., also known as Uncle Leroy, even worked with Granddaddy from time-to-time.

Folks would put an “ice card” in a front window of the house which would indicate what size block of ice was needed. The card had four large numbers, usually “15”, “25” and “35”, with “50” on the reverse side. By taking note of these cards, the “Iceman” could tell, at a glance, how much ice was needed to fill the ice box chamber.  If a housewife wanted 25 pounds she would place the card in the window with the 25-pound number up, and the 35-pound number upside down.

For the younger siblings, having a Dad who was the manager of the ice plant had its perks. The plant was located by the railroad, alongside which they walked each day, to and from school. They would stop by the plant after school on hot days, and gather up ice chips in their hands and eat them on the way home. Who needed ice cream?

The ICEMEN who made the ice deliveries, wore capes. They were made of rubber, to protect them from the cold and wet, as they hoisted the ice blocks to their backs with the tongs and carried them into customers’ kitchens. The cape gave them the look of cape-wearing SUPERHEROES. But, Granddaddy’s children and grandchildren didn’t need to see him in a cape to know that he was a SUPERHERO; watching him fight the oppression that all Blacks faced in those days just to provide for his family, was good enough.

But alas, like all SUPERHEROS, he had his hamartia. For Superman, it was Kryptonite. For Granddaddy, it was the ammonia that was used in the ice-making process; that and the constant cold conditions, which together, caused irreversible damage to his lungs. However, despite the effects of his KRYPTONITE, he survived to a ripe old age. He SURVIVED because he was STRONG, and ONLY THE STRONG SURVIVE.

“You can’t be too careful about work. It’s the most dangerous habit known to medical science.”

Eugene O’Neill, The Iceman Cometh

Love ya Granddaddy Leroy

True Railroad Stories: The Gathering of the Fireflies

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These are true stories about my father’s experiences working on the Railroad for 31 years. I hope that you enjoy them as much as I do.

Lady G 😘💋

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There is a creek running under the railroad track in a rural section of the mainline between two major cities in Georgia.

My train crossed the bridge over this creek on trips to and from these cities–usually in the dark of night.

At a certain time of year, fireflies would gather, in numbers too many to count, from the surface of the creek, up to, and above the trees lining either side of the creek’s banks.  These wondrous creatures were so closely compacted that they illuminated the entire area in a way that resembled a spectacular show of lights.

On nights, during the time of year for the fireflies, our crew would, on approaching the bridge, slow the train down and dim the engine headlights in order to observe this spectacular scene.  We were well aware that we were among only a few who would ever be lucky enough to witness this beautiful and natural phenomenon.  

Over the years, I would fondly recall and ponder the meaning of this experience.

I concluded that every firefly represents the birth of a new soul that is beginning life on earth.

Usually, that soul arrives in our midst, finds a mate, lives its life here on Earth and then departs.

Southern folklore has it that each soul that once resided on earth is represented by a star in the heavens. I believe that a flickering star is sending a heavenly signal to its earthly mate about its new location.

In essence, it is an invitation for both of them to reunite and spend eternity together.

Admittedly, I can’t be sure that my belief is true; but, it definitely seems likely because the firefly show took place at Spirit Creek.

-The Conductor

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I don’t know about y’all but I believe that my Daddy could be right!  

At least I’d like to think so anyway.